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Speaker: The Rev. Nathan Stomberg

  • 25 September 2022

    The Rev. Stomberg and the Rev. Galloway discuss the love of money and how Christians should handle their wealth. The conversation also covers wealth, generosity, capitalism vs. socialism, immigration, the principle of subsidiarity, circles of influence vs. concern, and more.

  • 11 September 2022

    With the passing of Queen Elizabeth, we lose one of the final links in the chain of history which binds us to the storied history and tradition, and indeed the greatness of Western Civilization, blessed by God and founded on Judeo-Christian principles, to which we owe nearly every comfort and luxury which we enjoy today. Listen as the Rector reflects on the life of Queen Elizabeth II.

  • 4 September 2022

    Counterintuitive as it may sound, it is precisely the call to sacrifice which we must embrace and offer to the world today if we wish to see the church grow. People of my generation and younger especially have caught on to the façade of contemporary worship, for it is so clearly divorced from the reality of life, which is hard! Life is hardly ever holding hands and singing kumbaya, it is a daily struggle against sin, and pain, and grief, and shame. Christ delivers us from all those things, but only if we join Him in the fight.

  • 21 August 2022

    Our faith MUST be lived out in action, brothers and sisters! That doesn’t mean our problems go away, but when our hearts cry out, “how long,” we can drown out all those negative thoughts and voices that accuse us with the joyful song of the whole company of heaven. And we can run to the Sacraments and satisfy our spiritual hunger and thirst at the feast we share with all the saints who are cheering us on.

  • 7 August 2022

    The battle between good and evil must be fought within our own hearts each and every day. This is why our works can’t save us, because we can’t possibly do anything on our own merit to earn our salvation. Only one person lived that perfect life, and that was Jesus Christ, the God-man, who offered himself up as a sacrifice to God for our sins, and not for ours only, but for the sins of the whole world.

  • 24 July 2022

    A person who is held captive by ideology will use his end to justify any means. This is why we see our own social and political discourse breaking down today – ideology, not reason and the love of Christ, is what controls both sides of the debate. We as a people have been taken captive by philosophy and empty deceit. Listen as the Rector discusses Paul’s warning to the Colossians, and to us today.

  • 17 July 2022

    What are you anxious about? By virtue of living on this side of the veil of tears, the list is long. Sometimes our anxieties are big: the safety and security of our country; the rising tension in national politics; the kind of future our children and grandchildren will be born into; the state of the economy (“did you hear we hit another 40-year high for inflation?”); nuclear war; natural disaster; widespread disease. We are anxious about many things. This is why the story of Martha hosting Jesus at her home is memorable to us, because it is relatable. Being anxious is normal, but it is not helpful. Listen as the Rector explains how we can focus on that which is necessary by the power of prayer.

  • 3 July 2022

    What is commonly understood and fought for as liberty today is in fact libertinism. A “libertine” is “a person devoid of most moral principles, a sense of responsibility, or sexual restraints, which are seen as unnecessary or undesirable, especially someone who ignores or even spurns accepted morals and forms of behavior sanctified by the larger society.” Saint Paul gives us a different definition of liberty. In his letter to Galatians, he writes, “I have been crucified with Christ. It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me. And the life I now live in the flesh I live by faith in the Son of God, who loved me and gave himself up for me” (Galatians 2:20).

  • 26 June 2022

    Every sinful instinct we have tells us we can do it all on our own. We are beholden to our pride. We are so held captive by our pride, that we have a whole month to celebrate it! The bread of man is this: you can define who you are; you can define your identity; you can do whatever you want and expect the world to affirm you; you can define your own meaning of life; you get to define your meaning of love, your meaning of truth, your meaning of justice. All the answers, and ultimately your salvation, are found deep inside yourself. The Holy Eucharist is a repudiation of all of this, everything our culture stands for.